When we started the Intelligent Car Coalition three years ago, we knew the culturally diverse automotive, telecom and tech industries would have to come together on certain public policy matters in order for important autonomous and connected technologies to thrive.

In our first published column, “Meet the Intelligent Car,” we introduced the idea that connected and autonomous vehicles would save lives, save time, save money, and save fuel. We were the first to point out that these technologies are different because they benefit all of society – not just individual users.

In later work, we pioneered the case for collaborative solution-seeking among industry stakeholders to help resolve policy issues. We said that a light-touch regulatory approach could help speed digital technologies to market, making us all safer on the roads.

We said a technology-neutral approach is important in developing policy on these matters. We pointed out that some lessons may be taken from the intentional, thoughtful way policymakers handled the birth of the Internet.

These ideas are now well accepted. But we still have work to do.

We believe it benefits all stakeholders when consumers and decision-makers know the facts about autonomous and connected technologies. We believe it helps innovators in each industry to know how other industries have dealt with new policy challenges in their fields, and to see where those solutions might be applied.

And we believe it helps all of us when policy issues are resolved so we can move with certainty toward a future of more safety, mobility, and transportation efficiency on our nation’s roads and highways.